Archive for the ‘Photography Workshops’ Category

Posing Workshop

Last week we ran a mini “Posing Workshop” for the first time in Edmonton and it went fantastic! I’ll admit, the hours leading up to this event were a bit of a nail biter… even as Susan drove to meet up with the students at Whitemud Park, we wondered if we should bail and began discussing some indoor locations because the sky was a scary shade of green, and as she merged on to the Whitemud, the rain started pouring! NOOO! Alberta weather is so unpredictable and as a Wedding and Portrait Photographer for Picture That Photography, Susan is pretty used to coming up with alternative locations on the fly, but with students and models a half hour away, there was definitely some added pressure to pull this thing together.

After getting pelted with rain in the parking lot for awhile, at 6:30 when the workshop was to begin, suddenly the sky started clearing up and the rain stopped! Amazingly enough, the weather held just long enough for the workshop and then as she and the students loaded their gear to leave, the rain began again – talk about lucky!

We had beautiful models for this event who came dressed to the nines and willing to try anything! And by anything, I mean this brave model laid down in the mud at the end of the night and the result was stunning! Here is a photo submitted by a student in the workshop, Rodney King:

rodney-king-posing-workshop-in-edmonton

A common question we get asked from students is, What should I bring on a photoshoot? Here is a quick list of items you shouldn’t leave home without:

  • A step ladder for taking photos from a higher angle,
  • Blankets for covering the ground,
  • Paper Towel for wiping off places to sit, and
  • Bug Spray! The mosquitos in the wooded areas of Alberta can be super irritating so douse yourself and bring extra for your subjects! It’s pretty hard to get relaxed, candid moments like this, when your clients are getting eaten alive by mosquitos!

posing-workshop-in-edmonton

We covered a lot in a couple of hours at this workshop, if you missed it – don’t despair! We have a family edition of this workshop coming in August! We already have some great models lined up for this workshop as well and it will be focused on posing families and children –  Register today!

 


Camera Tricks and Photo Tips

What do you do when you host a Christmas photo walk, register a bunch of students and then the day that once seemed so far into the future, comes around and you look outside and discover there is no snow?  Well, first you throw a bit of a tantrum but then you channel all of your creative energy, raid your craft cupboard and come  up with ways to capture awesome winter photos, without snow. Here are the awesome tricks that  Susan Temme pulled out for the photo walk in Edmonton on Friday.

Making Magic with An Acrylic Picture Frame

Even with the absence of snow, we were able to create a really cool reflection that gives the look of ice or a reflecting pool in front of the Alberta Legislature Building. You can make this happen by inserting a piece of black construction paper in a plastic dollar store picture frame and then hold it underneath your lens. Experiment and tilt it around a bit until you get the effect you want, and voila!

edmonton-photo-walk

This photo would actually be quite ordinary without the addition of our acrylic frame trick. In reality, there are actually no lights to the left of the snowman. To add some extra color and make things more interesting, we again hold the acrylic picture frame up to the lens, this time on the left side, and it reflects the lights from the right of the snowman. This definitely added some drama to our snowman photo.

snowmanwithlights

Fun with Filters

Have you ever tried using a shaped filter for your bokeh shots? First, grab some black construction paper and cut a circle larger then your lens. Next, cut a shape out of the middle of your circle (Susan sort of free handed a multi-edged star). Then, tape it around your lens, set your camera to manual focus and start experimenting!

bokeh-with-a-shaped-filter-edmonton-photo-walk

Even without snow, our last photo walk was a success! If you weren’t able to come, give these techniques a try and show us your crafty camera work on instagram @thecplc or send them to us at [email protected]

 

discount-on-photography-classes-in-edmonton-and-calgary


Histograms in ‘vintage photography’

To learn about these principles and put them into practice, take Ambient Portrait Lighting Workshop and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic CC at the CPLC.

A typical histogram in vintage photography

Vintage photography has several different definitions, but one of them that we will focus on for this post is the common inclusion of sun flare, achieved through shooting towards the sun and allowing a little (and sometimes a lot) of the sunlight to enter into the lens in order to wash out the colours and the contrast. This look is very popular right now and has been for a couple years, and it introduces a non-conventional, or according to some, ‘bad’ histogram that has its own needs for editing.

Vintage Histograms | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 100, f/4, 1/200 sec

Vintage Histograms | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca

Here is the histogram for the above shot, and as you see, it is very right-skewed. This is a stereotypical vintage shot histogram, which, by the very nature of it’s allowing sun flare to wash out colours and contrast, is by definition lacking in blacks, shadows, and even darker mid tones. In classical photography, this would be considered a ‘weak’, if not ‘bad’, histogram. This is by no means true, but an understanding of classical editing certainly produces a more nuanced and informed view of vintage, which is never a bad thing. That is, we can keep the original vintage look, or find a merger between the two. Both are acceptable and fine, as long as we like the final image. The thing with vintage, since it is a style, is that by definition there will be a subjective response. Some of you will love this image or the edited version below, and some of you will hate it. That’s just the nature of ‘style’ in photography.

One approach to editing vintage histograms

Vintage Histograms | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca

In this image, the same as above but edited, we’ve added some of the common markers of vintage editing, including split toning, warm tones, etc. We’ve also reduced one of the limitations of all cameras when they shoot toward the sun (namely, small dynamic range), and added some dynamic range in editing by punching up the blacks in order to shift the histogram to the left.

Vintage Histograms | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca

Vintage Histograms | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca

Crucially, we’ve kept the vintage look by not actually making the histogram touch the left-hand side (this would undo the vintage look altogether, at which point, we would have done better to never have gotten sun flare in the first place, a simple move achievable by simply shifting our angle), but we have shifted it nonetheless, by first moving the exposure slider to the left, and second moving the Blacks slider in Lightroom to the left. The Shadows slider has been used as a counter-balance to ensure in doing so we haven’t added too much contrast to the image, and by balancing this way we’ve made sure the ‘softness’ of the vintage feel isn’t undone by the darkening of the image.

To learn more about these principles and put them into practice, take the Ambient Portrait Lighting Workshop and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic CC at the CPLC.


Using flash with glass

To learn about these principles and put them into practice, take Portrait Lighting Workshop and Accessory Flash Workshop at the CPLC.

The reflectance of glass

Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
Source: http://www.rolith.com/applications/anti-reflective

Have you ever tried to take a photo of a subject that’s behind glass? You might have noticed that sometimes it works, and sometimes you just get a blinding glare of light, and reflection of what’s behind you, or even you yourself, in the glass, and that what’s behind the glass is erased and replaced by this reflection. The reason for this is that while glass does allow light to pass through it, the angle at which you look through it in relation to the angle at which the light source is lighting it matters (the technical term for this is ‘direct reflection’, which we cover the theory of and do exercises that circumvent the problem in our Portrait Lighting Workshop). So, in the following shot, where we are shooting toward the sun, we would be able to see through the glass of the front windshield because the sun isn’t behind us. However, if the sun was behind us, all’d we see would be white on the windshield, literally a reflection of the white sky, just like the in the first image in this post (because the upward angle of the windshield would act like a mirror, and it’s pointed at an angle toward the sky from the viewer’s vantage point).

Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/200 sec

Here’s a close-up of the same shot:
Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca

Light the subject on the same side of the glass

It is the nature of glass, it’s nature of ‘direct reflection’ specifically, that disallows us from lighting a subject on the other side of glass from our flash (or ambient light source, for that matter). As such, the only way to light a subject that is too dark, as in this case, that is behind a pane of glass is to put the flash on the same side as the subject is. In this case, it meant putting the flash inside the car. Unfortunately, the opportunity for softening the light when the flash is inside a car is minimal, as the flash needs to light up their faces, and there is essentially no room to put the flash behind the glass, but in front of their faces, so that we can light up their faces but at the same time not see the flash. In this first example, we see an unsuccessful attempt which put the flash between the two subjects, pointed straight up at them. Notice the ‘Halloween lighting’ on her face, caused by being lit from below, a general ‘no-no’ in photographic lighting?

Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/200 sec, off-camera flash inside car, pointed straight up at subjects at 1/16 power.

Here’s a close-up of the same shot:
Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca

Always soften light by bouncing or diffusing

So, in this last shot, we had to figure out a way to make the light come from in front of their faces, but still be on the same side of the glass as their faces. We did this by keeping the flash in the same spot in the car, but instead of pointing it straight up at the subjects, we pointed it forward and up, so that it flashed the dashboard of the car. By doing so, it spread out, became a larger light source, and then bounced back and lit them up more evenly. This worked, in this case, even though the dashboard was largely black, because we also increased the power of the flash 3 stops (from 1/16 to ½ power) to compensate for how much light would be lost to absorption from the black dashboard. You can see that the faces are now lit more evenly and widely, and that the ‘Halloween lighting’ is gone. In addition, since it comes from in front of them, you can see nice big catchlights in the subject’s eyes, popping her out from the dark background in the car even more.

Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/200 sec, off-camera flash inside car, pointed straight toward dashboard at ½ power.

Here’s a close-up of the same shot:
Off-camera flash | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca


Getting Starburst Effects off of Points of Light

For more information and practical exercises on the topics in this blog post, take Using Your DSLR or Mirrorless Camera and Getting Proper Exposures at the CPLC.

Noticing the potential

Sometimes you accidentally stumble on the potential for a better image than you originally conceived. Take this next shot as the starting point.

Getting Starburst Effects | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/200 sec

After looking at the scene, the photographer noticed that there were several points off of the car where the light was hitting and bouncing as points. The fact that there points or ‘hits’ of reflection meant that with different camera settings, a cool effect could be added to the photo while maintaining the same exposure. In addition, the sun flare which was coming into the camera (caused by shooting toward the sun) had points of blurred colour that indicated potential for another effect.

Higher f/stops and starburst

To take advantage of both these potential effects, we need to increase our f/stops to one of the highest numbers it can go to. On this lens, that meant f/22. In order to keep the exposure consistent, this meant raising the ISO in tandem to keep the exposure consistent (4 stops darker in aperture, and 4 stops brighter in ISO).

Getting Starburst Effects | Calgary photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 1600, f/22, 1/200 sec

With the exposure the same, the effect of the higher f/stops allowed for two things. First, it turned the reflection points off of the car into a ‘starburst’ effect, a side-effect of having higher f/stops. Second, it brought the ‘haze’ of sun flare into the depth of field, so that the hazy colours were now rendered as more ‘3D’ like shapes of colours.

To learn more about these techniques and get hands-on practice with them, take Using Your DSLR or Mirrorless Camera and Getting Proper Exposures at the CPLC.


Picture That Photography Wedding Workshop

                    wedding photography class edmonton wedding photography workshop
Susan and Krister of Picture That Photography have photographed weddings for over 8 years. Experts in both lighting and posing, they have not only many years of photography under their belt, but have also been teaching and developing photography curriculum for over 5 years. They are award-winning photographers whose work has been featured in magazines such as “Bride and Groom Magazine”, “Blush”, and “Canadian Bride”. Their work has been featured on leading industry websites such as “Style Me Pretty”, “Wedluxe”, and “Wedding Chicks”.

In this workshop, Susan and Krister will share how they became successful full-time photographers, by teaching you all they have learned. Learn how to elevate your wedding photography to the next level by learning how to reproduce studio-quality lighting with just one on-camera flash, and how to light receptions to produce bright photographs that preserve the ambient mood and natural colours of the room. Learn how to pose and light brides and grooms to emphasize their positive features and minimize problem areas.
                    edmonton wedding photography workshop edmonton wedding photographer workshop
Learn how to incorporate a given background in your image to complement the bride, as well as how to use spaces that are not attractive in person, and make them look stunning in your images.

You will first photograph a stylized shoot with an emphasis on location and details, and will have time to both pose and light bride and groom models, along with help and assistance by Susan and Krister. A second shoot will strip away the details and focus solely on using various backgrounds, posing, and lighting, on bride and groom models.

Susan and Krister will also share their business model, pricing structure, and sales techniques. You will learn how to find products that complement your style and, a sales system that gets these in the hands of your clients.
                    edmonton wedding photography class edmonton wedding photographer workshop

Susan and Krister will also pass on their editing workflow, from shooting method, organizing, editing, straight through to printing and delivery to clients.

Sign up for this tell-all workshop and learn from some of Canada’s best wedding photographers! Add amazing images to your portfolio and kick your wedding business into high gear!

What some of our past students have said about them: “Susan was amazing” – Ashley “Krister’s Instruction was perfection” – Laurie “Susan wants you to succeed!” – Wynne Vokins, “This pushed me to be more creative. I feel that my photos have transformed from documentation to artistic expression as a result” – Tyler McKay, “Great technical instruction” Dina Honke, “Very good at simplifying complex issues” – Joyce Eckstrand, “Willing to answer any questions” – Carolyn Wilson, Susan is extremely intelligent on the subject matter…pace was fantastic… cannot believe how much I’ve learned… I cannot believe how much I’ve changed. Krister is so knowledgeable I have no idea how he retains so much information. He is very thorough as well” – Amanda Sorge.
                    edmonton photography class edmonton wedding photographer class

Length & Format 16 instructional hours
2 Days 10am to 7pm with 1 hour for lunch
Fee $1,300 SALE! $1050 + GST Ends April 30th
Maximum Number of Students 12
Prerequisites Students must be knowledgeable in using their cameras in manual mode, and basic editing knowledge of Lightroom and/or Photoshop.
Bring With You
  • Camera, Bat­teries, accessory flash, and memory card
  • Note taking supplies
  • Optional: laptop computer with Lightroom and Photoshop installed (trial versions are available for free)
Location
King’s University College (More Info)
11010 Jasper Ave NW
Edmonton AB T5K 0K9
Scheduled Date
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Due to limited spacing reservations and registrations for this workshop are non-refundable.


Picture That Photography Family Workshop Announced for June 2014

Susan and Krister of Picture That Photography, are industry leaders in family photography. Experts in both lighting and posing, they have not only many years of photography under their belt, but have also been teaching and developing photography curriculum for over 5 years.
                    family photography class family photography class
This summer, join Picture That Photography to increase your skills in posing and lighting families of various sizes. Learn to photograph children of various ages, and deal with common challenges in family photography.

In this one day intensive workshop, you will learn marketing tricks and tips to attract the clients you want, and seal the deal when they approach you. They will candidly share their sales techniques, and show you how to choose and promote products that go hand-in-hand with style.
                    Arneson Family 2013-034 family photographer workshop
In addition to great photos for your portfolio, you will learn their workflow from importing and backing up to editing in both Lightroom and Photoshop. You will learn the basics of editing for colour, sharpness, cropping as well as more advanced techniques such as thinning, removing objects from backgrounds and cleaning up skin.

Taking this workshop will increase the calibre of your family photography and give you a great portfolio to start marketing family sessions for the summer. Want to kick start family photography for your business? With great portfolio shots out of this workshop, better posing and lighting to bring your photos to the next level, and a business model to ensure income, this workshop is a must!

                    family photography workshop family photography edmonton

What some of our past students have said about them: “Susan was amazing” – Ashley “Krister’s Instruction was perfection” – Laurie “Susan wants you to succeed!” – Wynne Vokins, “This pushed me to be more creative. I feel that my photos have transformed from documentation to artistic expression as a result” – Tyler McKay, “Great technical instruction” Dina Honke, “Very good at simplifying complex issues” – Joyce Eckstrand, “Willing to answer any questions” – Carolyn Wilson, Susan is extremely intelligent on the subject matter…pace was fantastic… cannot believe how much I’ve learned… I cannot believe how much I’ve changed. Krister is so knowledgeable I have no idea how he retains so much information. He is very thorough as well” – Amanda Sorge.

                                                  susan temme, picture that photography krister temme, picture that photography

Length & Format 8 instructional hours
1 Day 10am to 7pm with 1 hour for lunch
Fee $700 SALE! $599 + GST Ends April 30th
Maximum Number of Students 10
Prerequisites Students must be knowledgeable in using their camera in manual mode. It would be helpful to have a basic knowledge of Lightroom.
Bring With You
  • Camera, Bat­teries, and memory card, as well as flash if available
  • Note taking supplies
  • optional: laptop computer with Lightroom installed
Location
King’s University College (More Info)
11010 Jasper Ave NW
Edmonton AB T5K 0K9
Scheduled Date
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Due to limited spacing reservations and registrations for this workshop are non-refundable.


Tips on Using a Diffuser & Ambient Light

For more information and practical exercises on the topics in this blog post, take Portrait Lighting Workshop and Ambient Portrait Lighting Workshop at the CPLC.

Sunlight causes hard shadows

One of the things that will start to bug you more and more as you take more photos are the hard lines of the edges of shadows that come from sunlight. What makes some lights cause hard edges and others not? The answer is ‘hard light’ causes hard shadows, and ‘soft light’ causes soft shadows. The definition of hard light is a light source that is small relative to the subject you are lighting. Even though the sun is, obviously, huge, it is so far away that relative to, say, a person that the sun is lighting, the sun is actually relatively small. As such, you will see hard shadows, visible in part by the hard lines between shade and sun, as in the lighting on the woman’s face below.

Diffusing Ambient Light | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 50, f/3.2, 1/200 sec

And here’s a closeup for a better view of the dark vs. bright area on her face.

Diffusing Ambient Light | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 50, f/3.2, 1/200 sec

While sometimes we can block this lighting by rotating the subject’s position so that their face is lit only by sun (although this will cast dark shadows in the eyes and off of the nose), or better, only by shade, in cases such as this one, doing so would change the angle on the fence, and background, to a worse one that would hurt the composition and lines in the photo.

Softening hard sunlight with a diffuser

As such, to preserve this vision for the photo, the next best move is most often to bring out a diffuser and put it between the sun and the subject.

Diffusing Ambient Light | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 50, f/2.8, 1/200 sec

From the perspective of the person holding the diffuser, this will look like you are trying to cast the circular shadow of the diffuser over the subject, so that they are entirely in the shade of the diffuser. Once this is done, the resulting image erases the negative effect of hard lighting, by replacing it with even, soft lighting.

Diffusing Ambient Light | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 50, f/2.8, 1/200 sec

Again, here’s a closeup to show the softer lighting.

Diffusing Ambient Light | Edmonton photography classes | cplc.ca
ISO 50, f/2.8, 1/200 sec

It is soft lighting because, relative to the subject, the light source is now larger than the subject. That is, the sun hits the diffuser, and because of the size of the diffuser (and not, as is commonly, and wrongly, taught, because it is passing through the white fabric), which is relatively larger than the subject’s head, the lighting is soft, and so no hard shadows are cast on the face.

While this does take 2 people to accomplish, and might seem unrealistic to you, it is worth noting that the vast majority of photos you see in magazines, etc. are taken by teams of photographers working together, so this is by no means abnormal. Besides, it’s more fun shooting with a friend, and you can always take turns diffusing for the other person!

To put this skill into practice and get some hands-on experience, take Portrait Lighting Workshop and Ambient Portrait Lighting Workshop at the CPLC!


Editing Contrast and Colours in Lightroom

Today let’s look at quickly punching up contrast and colours in a portrait shot lit by ambient light, in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.

Editing Saturation and Vibrance

Photoshop Lightroom Ambient Portrait Editing - Calgary Photography Classes
ISO 320, f/2.8, 1/500 sec

First let’s talk colours, since those stand out right away. While there are lots of ways to enhance the colours more specifically, the quickest and safest way is certainly the ‘Vibrance’ slider, which has been turned to +30 as seen in the settings picture below.

Photoshop Lightroom Ambient Portrait Editing - Calgary Photography Classes

Notice the increased vibrancy, or saturation, in the flowers but also in the trees in the background? We also see it in the colouring in her hair and skin. One quick tip is to avoid the Saturation slider, which is an older, more ‘brutish’ way of achieving the same effect. Watch what happens if we do everything the same, except instead of setting Vibrance to +30, we do Saturation to +30 instead.

Photoshop Lightroom Ambient Portrait Editing - Calgary Photography Classes
Left: Out-of-camera
Middle: Saturation +30
Right: Vibrance +30

When we use Saturation, the skin gets too colourful, so that even if we like the boosted colours the skin is too saturated. Vibrance is brilliant because while it enhances colours as seen above, it does a very good job of keeping skin tones untouched (relatively speaking), producing a more natural looking image.

Editing Contrast

Moving onto contrast, even though Lightroom has a slider labelled Contrast, it is generally smarter to achieve Contrast in one of two other ways, or both. In this example, we’ve used both of these alternate ways. The first is punching up the Highlights and Whites slider even brighter, making the out-of-camera ‘dull’ brightness ‘hit’ harder in the final image. Mixed with that is turning down the Blacks slider (and often the Shadows slider, though here we did not do that because the image was lit by ambient, not flash light, and the face is dimmer than it ‘should be’ because of that). This produces a boost in contrast, but with far more control than if we just moved the Contrast slider (which as in this case, is desirable because of the under-lit face).

Photoshop Lightroom Ambient Portrait Editing - Calgary Photography Classes
ISO 320, f/2.8, 1/500 sec

Photoshop Lightroom Ambient Portrait Editing - Calgary Photography Classes

Coupled with this move of turning down Blacks and Shadows, and turning up Whites and Highlights, we can also go to the Tone Curve and turn it from Linear to Middle or Strong Contrast. In this case we shifted it to Strong Contrast. Either of these moves on their own will produce a stronger contrast image, turning a dull image into something with more vibrance, but used together they can sometimes increase the Contrast in a more subtle, and controlled way.

One last note here. We’ve mentioned that the fact this was lit by ambient light (without any sunlight bounced or reflected back onto the model’s face), and that this produced a ‘dimmer’ face than desirable. There is another issue with this lighting choice. Notice the green colouring on her skin, especially apparent when the Saturation slider was moved up instead of the Vibrance? This comes from the sun bouncing off of the green grass, and the green colouring from the grass bouncing back onto her skin, especially underneath the chin and on the neck. With flash photography, applied just subtly (not abrasively), this green colouring can be erased, catch-lights can be added, and a gradient light would have made the need for the Shadows slider, above, to be turned higher at all.

To learn about using Lightroom, take our Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic CC, and to learn more about how a subtle application of flash photography makes editing easier, take Accessory Flash Workshop. As an alternative to flash, bounced light could have achieved the same result. Take Ambient Portrait Lighting Workshop to learn the techniques involved in that!


Professional Fashion Photography Workshop With Amanda Diaz





Want to add a fashion element to your photographs? The CPLC is proud to host internationally recognized fashion photographer, Amanda Diaz, to help you do just that!

Learn to build your portfolio, work with designers, professional models, and a styling team. Learn about submitting your work to blogs and publications to build recognition and get your photos out there!

Amanda will talk to you from her own experience and show you how to build your brand and portfolio even on a small budget.

This intensive two day professional workshop will have a strong hands-on element and you will learn to photograph models in a natural light setting and a studio lighting setting. You will photograph two concepts, beauty and fashion to add a minimum of four new looks to your portfolio.

During this workshop you will be working with agency represented professional models, learning posing techniques together with lighting to help you succeed on your own by adding fashion photography elements into the type of photography you already love!

Day two of the workshop you will learn Amanda’s workflow and editing techniques using Adobe Photoshop. Learn to use curves, patching, and liquifying in to fix hair, slim, edit skin and eyes, remove background items, and perfect your photographs!

It is recommended that students have a basic knowledge of how to photograph in manual mode, and have Adobe Photoshop loaded on a laptop or portable computer for day 2 of the class. Come with questions and with your camera gear!

Length & Format 12 instructional hours
2 Days 9am to 5pm with 1 hour for lunch
Fee $1,500 SALE! $1,200 + GST Ends Sept 15th
Maximum Number of Students 12
Prerequisites None
Bring With You
  • Camera, Bat­teries, and memory card
  • Note taking supplies
  • Day 2 only laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop installed
Location
The Canterra Suites Hotel
11010 Jasper Ave NW
Edmonton AB T5K 0K9
Scheduled Dates Event Completed